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posted December 19, 2013

In February 2014, a group of health care and related providers will be travelling to India to conduct a medical mission. Among those providers are several from the UCLA School of Medicine including NFRC’s own Dr. Patricia Lester and Dr. Edye Garcia.  Other UCLA clinicians include Drs. Smitta Patel and Brenda Bursch; nurses Clarice Marsh and Kerry Gold; and Child Life Specialist Clarissa Byrd.

... Read more

posted December 18, 2013

National Military Family Association’s Operation Purple® Retreats are designed to help families renew their relationships through activities that promote team building, effective communication, and environmental education.

The upcoming February 2014 retreat will be held over four days (Feb 14-18) and offers a variety of... Read more

posted December 11, 2013

The UCLA Family STAR (Stress, Trauma, And Resilience) Clinic provides evaluation, consultation, prevention, and treatment services for children and family members affected by trauma and other challenging events, including medical illness, traumatic loss, community violence, disasters, and combat deployment stress. According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, a traumatic event can be used to describe an experience that was scary, threatening, dangerous, or violent. The event can either happen to someone directly or they may witness something happening to a loved one, normally... Read more

posted December 9, 2013

On December 14th, Associate Director of Training Dr. Edye Garcia and Director of Training Dr. Catherine Mogil will present 'From Diapers to Military Duty: Serving Young Children in Military and Veteran Families' at Zero to Three's 28th National Training Institute. 

From Diapers to... Read more

posted December 5, 2013

The UCLA NFRC is currently seeking participants for a pilot research study on the FOCUS (Families OverComing Under Stress) Early Childhood Training program. This program is designed to help OIF/OEF/OND Military and Veteran families with children ages 3 to 6 to increase family resilience. Click here to view the participant flyer for more details!

... Read more

posted December 4, 2013

The UCLA NFRC is featured in this month's issue of the American Psychological Association's Monitor on Psychology. The article "Building Family Resilience," highlights evidence-based interventions that are being implemented to serve Military families. FOCUS (Families OverComing Under Stress) Family Resilience Training, is profiled among other programs that are helping families to overcome challenges related to Military service including deployment, reintegration, trauma, and loss. The article includes an overview of FOCUS Family Resilience Training and its implementation on... Read more

posted November 27, 2013

A grant supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health was awarded to the UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center to support research focused on promoting resilience in Military families with young children.

LOS ANGELES– The UCLA Nathanson... Read more

posted November 14, 2013

Over the past six weeks, the UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center (NFRC) participated in the Newman’s Own Foundation Honoring Those Who Serve Fundraising Challenge. Hosted on CrowdRise, a crowdfundraising platform for nonprofits, the challenge involved organizations that serve United States military personnel, Veterans, and their families. In all, 28 participating charities raised $491,747 from more than 2,700 donations. An additional $180,000 was awarded by Newman’s Own Foundation. The Challenge was part of a larger Newman’s Own Foundation effort Honoring Those Who Serve. ... Read more

posted November 12, 2013

The UCLA Nathanson Family Resilience Center (NFRC) was featured in the Daily Bruin as a resource for Veterans and their families.

Read the full article on the Daily Bruin Website here: http://dailybruin.com/2013/11/12/program-focuses-on-veteran-reintegration/

posted November 6, 2013

Young people ages 18-24 make up approximately 12% of the homeless population in the United States1. Each year in California, there is an estimated 200,000 homeless youth2.  These young people are often coming from conflicted or unstable home environments and have run away in an attempt to escape or resolve family problems. Once homeless, their risk for mental health challenges such as PTSD and depression, suicide, drug abuse and addiction, and HIV/AIDS increases3. Resulting from the instability of living on the streets, these young people also face many... Read more

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