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Trainees & Interns

Post Doctoral Fellow

Elisa Brown Fuller
Post Doctoral Fellow

Elisa Brown Fuller is a postdoctoral fellow in the Nathanson Family Resilience Center at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.  As a member of the Family Development Program, she provides psychotherapeutic support to parents of medically fragile infants who have been admitted to or graduated from the neonatal intensive care unit.  She attended Fielding Graduate University’s Ph.D. program in clinical psychology with a focus on parent infant mental health.  During her clinical internship at the Immaculata University Internship Consortium in Pennsylvania, she worked with underserved, ethnically diverse children and high-risk young mothers.  In her work with families, she emphasizes relationship-based interventions aimed at addressing relational difficulties and developmental trauma as a result of early childhood separation, abuse, or neglect.

Holly Paymon, PhD
Post Doctoral Fellow

Holly Paymon, Ph.D., is an Early Childhood and Integrated Care Postdoctoral Fellow in the Nathanson Family Resilience Center (NFRC) in the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. Dr. Paymon specializes in early intervention and development during early childhood, supporting healthy parent-child interactions, and in providing trauma-informed care for children and families. Through the Family Development Program, she provides psychotherapeutic support to vulnerable families with a baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

Dr. Paymon earned her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She also holds master’s degrees in Clinical Psychology and in Infant Family Practice. Prior to Dr. Paymon’s fellowship at UCLA, she completed her clinical internship at UC Davis Children’s hospital in the Child and Adolescent Abuse Resources and Evaluation (CAARE) Diagnostic and Treatment Center, where she specialized in infant mental health and complex childhood trauma treatment, with an emphasis on providing Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), as well as psychological and child welfare evaluations.

Fun fact: she loves to travel and visits a different country each year.

Nicole Hisaka, PsyD
Post Doctoral Fellow

Nicole Hisaka, PsyD is a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Stress, Trauma and Resilience (STAR) Clinic in the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. Dr. Hisaka specializes in treating youth and families who have experienced trauma and other stressors, with an emphasis on parent-child interaction therapy, trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, and child and parent group therapy. Dr. Hisaka earned her PsyD. in clinical psychology from Alliant University. Prior to Dr. Hisaka’s fellowship at UCLA, she completed her clinical internship at UC Davis Children’s Hospital where she specialized in complex childhood trauma treatment and child-welfare evaluations working with underserved, foster-care, and adopted youth populations.

Dr. Hisaka’s research interests center on children with complex trauma histories, with an emphasis on pediatric chronic medical trauma and the effects on family dynamics. She is interested in empirically supported care among underserved groups and is trained in various trauma-informed and evidence-based treatments.

Clinical Psychology Intern

Jessica L. O'Leary, MA
Clinical Psychology Intern

Jessica L. O’Leary, M.A. is a Clinical Psychology intern at the Stress, Trauma and Resilience (STAR) Clinic in the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA.  Jessica is a Doctor of Philosophy candidate in Clinical Psychology at Clark University. Prior to pursuing her doctoral studies, she taught sixth grade at a public middle school in Los Angeles and completed a Master of Arts in Elementary Education at Loyola Marymount University. Jessica’s research interests center on how to foster resilience among urban youth, with an emphasis on emotion socialization and the role of caregivers. Her dissertation focuses on factors that protect urban youth from the deleterious effects of community violence. She is interested in empirically-supported care among underserved groups and is trained in various trauma informed and evidence based models.

Laura P. Minero, MA
Clinical Psychology Intern

Laura P. Minero, M.A. is a Clinical Psychology intern at the Stress, Trauma, and Resilience (STAR) Clinic  in the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. Laura is a Doctor of Philosophy candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin where she was awarded the Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship and a research grant from the Latino Center for Leadership Development through SMU’s John Goodwin’s Tower Center for Political Studies. Her research and advocacy work parallels her clinical work as a bicultural and bilingual therapist focused on fostering strength and resilience among underserved populations across the lifespan. Laura has a passion for examining how policy impacts the lived experiences of undocumented immigrant, Latinx, and LGBTQ+ communities in hopes of being able to identify how to better serve these populations through more inclusive implementation of policy, teaching of clinical practice and distribution of services.